Category Archives: Linux

Fix ZFSonLinux pool auto expanding

If you’re having issues with zfsonlinux and your pool not expanding after replacing your hard drives with larger ones then here is a trick to fix it. Continue reading

Fix zfs-mount.service failing after reboot on Proxmox

In my new homelab migration to Proxmox I came across a bug that will prevent you from being able to mount all your ZFS mount points and be a pain in the ass even more if you host containers in that folder.
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LXC allow non-root users to bind to port 80 (couchpotato example)

A follow-up to my last post dealing with unprivileged port access on linux containers.

This time, I have a couchpotato container that I want to change its default port from 5050 to port 80, so that it is as simple as http://mycouch/ to access from the local network.
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Allow non-root processes to bind to privileged (ports <1024) on linux

As I work on my homelab migration from FreeNAS into Linux containers, I need to move my freebsd jails to LXC.

In *nix any usage of well-known ports (aka 1024 or less) requires special privileges or a kernel setting. In FreeBSD a simple sysctl net.inet.ip.portrange.reservedhigh =1 was enough to allow the BSD jail to use any port on the jail.

On LXC, I had to figure out how to do the same thing and its quite different. My environment is a debian stretch LXC container but should work on other linux versions.

# apt-get install libcap2-bin
# setcap 'cap_net_bind_service=+ep' /usr/bin/transmission-daemon

In the example above, the binary /usr/bin/transmission-daemon is now able to open any port, or port 80 http in my case all while running a service as a non-root user.

Hopefully these helps folks out there, the answer took some digging but I already had an idea on what was needed thanks to my FreeBSD experience in zones 🙂

Install proxmox on a partition instead of a full-disk

By default, installing Proxmox with ZFS during the installation process will force you to use the entire disk for the root zpool. For most installs this is good enough. However, I like to do things differently sometimes.

I have a pair of Samsung 840 Pro 256GB SSDs that I wanted to use for my new homelab that I am currently building (moving from vmware to proxmox). You may be wondering why I want to install the operating system on a partition instead of an entire disk. Several reasons:
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Xenserver 7.1 a good contender to replace esxi

I have been a big fan and user of vmware ESXi for years, I started playing with it since circa 2008. The bare metal hypervisor and its easy to use GUI on Windows makes virtualization management extremely easy.

However in the past couple of years the free version of esxi has moved to HTML5 web management, and in the latest ESXi version the Windows client (vSphere client) requires you to pay for a license a run a central vcenter server/vm in order to manage via GUI (non-web).

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Troubleshooting networking issues after fresh install of proxmox VE 4.4

Writing a quick troubleshooting guide and informative post to address an issue I came across when installing Proxmox VE 4.4 on two of my machines.

On servers with more than two network interfaces Debian/Proxmox renames all interfaces and does not properly detect eth0 as the on-board ethernet as many other linux flavors. This may cause a mild headache if you just installed Proxmox with static IP addresses using the installer and upon reboot you can’t access any network resources. Continue reading

How to flash Seagate firmware onto HP enterprise MB2000EAMZF drives

In my previous post I talked about how HP locks down their hard drives (made by Seagate) with custom firmware that is exclusive to HP and with the huge caveat that if you do not have an HP storage controller the software update package provided by HP won’t work for you at all.

I spent the past 48 hours researching and trying different things. I unpacked the official HP firmware and tried to find the binary/firmware dump from within the .scexe file provided by HP on their website to no avail.  I even contacted HP for help and they would not be willing to help if the drives were not connected to HP hardware.

After some research I discovered that the HP MB2000EAMZF 2TB drive I had was almost exactly the same (part number) as the official Seagate ST32000644NS  drive after failing to be able to flash HPs firmware using HP’s bootable Firmware Update 8.3 (injecting the .scexe files inside this live CD) – I decided I really had nothing to lose but try the method I will explain below.
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Virtualization hypervisor and containers all in one

I’m a big fan of virtualization, the ability to run multiple platforms and operating systems (called guests) in a single server (called host) is probably one of the best computing technologies of the past 10 years.

Personally, I have been using virtualization circa 2004. It all took off after 2006 when chip manufacturer’s started bundling virtualization technologies in their processors (Intel VT-x or AMD-v). The reason why “cloud” computing is so popular can also be attributed to virtualization.

In a container world…

However, in the past couple of years a new technology has been making making the rounds everywhere, the words “containers”, “docker”, “orchestration” is picking up steam in the past year. They say that containers are changing the landscape for system administrators and application developers.

Claims that containers can be built and deployed in seconds, share a common storage layer and allow you to resize the container in real-time when you need more performance or capacity are really exciting concepts and I think the time is now for me to jump in and learn a thing of two about this new technology when its hot a new. Continue reading

Plex mediaserver on FreeNAS allowing anyone to stream without login

I’ve been a user of Plex mediaserver for over two years, I set this up on a FreeNAS jail a long time ago and in the past few days I noticed something funny.

Out of nowhere there were two additional streams going on in my server onto the internet, I usually share my library with friends and family but what was curious about this traffic was that Plex was claiming that these two streams were “on my local network”
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